COMMITTEE on WAYS and MEANS

Chairman Dave Camp

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48 out of 50 States Have Lost Jobs since 2009 Stimulus Law

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Washington, Jun 18, 2010 | comments

Despite the Administration’s declaration that this is the “Summer of Recovery,” data released today by the U.S. Department of Labor, and the chart below, show that virtually the entire country is experiencing a yet another season of continued unemployment. Through May 2010, the latest data available, a total of 48 out of 50 states have seen a net job loss since the President signed the Democrats’ $1 trillion “stimulus” bill into law in February 2009.  The data show that only Alaska, North Dakota and the District of Columbia have seen net job creation since then.  

 “This is just one more piece of data showing that the stimulus bill failed and the resulting run-up in debt is hurting our economy,” said Ways and Means Ranking Member Dave Camp.  “With the debt larger than 90 percent of our GDP, we are forfeiting as many as one million jobs.  Those are jobs families desperately need.   If we want to create sustained job growth in this country we have to get our spending, deficit and debt under control.  That starts by passing a budget – something Democrats have refused to do.”

To see how the Democrats’ deficit spending stimulus bill has failed your state, see the table below.
 

State

Administration Claims of Change in Jobs Through December 2010

Actual Change in Jobs Through May 2010

Alabama

+52,000

-40,400

Alaska

+8,000

+700

Arizona

+70,000

-69,900

Arkansas

+31,000

-17,700

California

+396,000

-495,400

Colorado

+59,000

-83,100

Connecticut

+41,000

-32,800

Delaware

+11,000

-6,300

District of Columbia

+12,000

+7,200

Florida

+206,000

-159,800

Georgia

+106,000

-117,500

Hawaii

+15,000

-7,800

Idaho

+17,000

-16,500

Illinois

+148,000

-144,600

Indiana

+75,000

-26,400

Iowa

+37,000

-23,100

Kansas

+33,000

-32,800

Kentucky

+48,000

-6,800

Louisiana

+50,000

-23,600

Maine

+15,000

-12,500

Maryland

+66,000

-16,600

Massachusetts

+79,000

-36,600

Michigan

+109,000

-94,100

Minnesota

+66,000

-45,400

Mississippi

+30,000

-20,800

Missouri

+69,000

-49,100

Montana

+11,000

-6,600

Nebraska

+23,000

-10,600

Nevada

+34,000

-64,600

New Hampshire

+16,000

-3,500

New Jersey

+100,000

-67,800

New Mexico

+22,000

-24,400

New York

+215,000

-89,500

North Carolina

+105,000

-66,000

North Dakota

+8,000

+4,800

Ohio

+133,000

-127,900

Oklahoma

+40,000

-38,600

Oregon

+44,000

-48,000

Pennsylvania

+143,000

-64,100

Rhode Island

+12,000

-14,800

South Carolina

+50,000

-14,400

South Dakota

+10,000

-5,400

Tennessee

+70,000

-50,300

Texas

+269,000

-100,000

Utah

+32,000

-16,900

Vermont

+8,000

-7,900

Virginia

+93,000

-28,000

Washington

+75,000

-67,700

West Virginia

+20,000

-10,700

Wisconsin

+70,000

-73,100

Wyoming

+8,000

-8,400

 
Source: Administration February 2009 
projection and Ways and Means staff calculations based on Department of Labor data.

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