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Chairman Dave Camp

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47 out of 50 States Have Lost Jobs since Democrats’ Stimulus Law

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Washington, Dec 17, 2010 | comments

As displayed in the chart below, Democrats’ 2009 stimulus bill has failed to create jobs, as 47 out of 50 states lost jobs between February 2009 (when the law was signed) and November 2010 (the most recent data).  It is telling that the only place in America that has exceeded the White House’s expectations for job creation is Washington, D.C.  Meanwhile 13 States (CA, CO, DE, GA, IL, KS, MI, MO, NV, OH, RI, WI, and WY) have lost more jobs to date than the Administration predicted they would gain. 

The U.S. unemployment rate has remained at or above 9.5% for 16 consecutive months - the longest period since the Great Depression.  Fortunately a bipartisan tax agreement was signed by the President today, preventing a job-killing tax hike from taking effect. While the Democrats have spent the past four years enacting unpopular, job-killing legislation, the passage of this bipartisan tax agreement is a positive sign for our nation’s employers that real economic recovery has a chance to take hold in the months ahead. 

State

Administration Projection of Change in Jobs Through December 2010

Actual Change in Jobs Through November 2010

Alabama

+52,000

-46,600

Alaska

+8,000

+3,600

Arizona

+70,000

-67,100

Arkansas

+31,000

-8,300

California

+396,000

-537,600

Colorado

+59,000

-81,300

Connecticut

+41,000

-36,900

Delaware

+11,000

-11,700

District of Columbia

+12,000

+22,400

Florida

+206,000

-180,000

Georgia

+106,000

-123,700

Hawaii

+15,000

-7,600

Idaho

+17,000

-16,000

Illinois

+148,000

-159,900

Indiana

+75,000

-43,400

Iowa

+37,000

-21,000

Kansas

+33,000

-35,900

Kentucky

+48,000

-8,900

Louisiana

+50,000

-14,900

Maine

+15,000

-9,700

Maryland

+66,000

-14,600

Massachusetts

+79,000

-43,100

Michigan

+109,000

-115,100

Minnesota

+66,000

-27,900

Mississippi

+30,000

-21,300

Missouri

+69,000

-72,000

Montana

+11,000

-9,800

Nebraska

+23,000

-9,500

Nevada

+34,000

-82,600

New Hampshire

+16,000

+3,600

New Jersey

+100,000

-93,200

New Mexico

+22,000

-20,500

New York

+215,000

-133,000

North Carolina

+105,000

-95,900

North Dakota

+8,000

+7,200

Ohio

+133,000

-165,400

Oklahoma

+40,000

-27,400

Oregon

+44,000

-35,900

Pennsylvania

+143,000

-70,300

Rhode Island

+12,000

-16,700

South Carolina

+50,000

-25,500

South Dakota

+10,000

-800

Tennessee

+70,000

-52,600

Texas

+269,000

-23,100

Utah

+32,000

-20,900

Vermont

+8,000

-5,500

Virginia

+93,000

-31,600

Washington

+75,000

-70,800

West Virginia

+20,000

-10,500

Wisconsin

+70,000

-73,000

Wyoming

+8,000

-9,300

 Source: Administration February 13, 2009 projection and actual U.S. Department of Labor data.



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