New Tax Code = New IRS

March 1, 2018 — Blog   

Unaccountable. Inaccessible. Intimidating. Unapproachable. That’s how many taxpayers would describe their experiences with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Over the last several years, the agency responsible for administering our nation’s tax code and serving nearly 140 million individual taxpayers has fallen short of fulfilling its mission.

For years, the Ways and Means Committee has been working to reverse this trend – examining challenges at the IRS and identifying solutions to hold the agency accountable to the people it is supposed to serve: hardworking Americans.

Now, with a simpler and fairer tax code, Committee Members are taking action to redesign the IRS and restore its Service First mission.

Over the coming weeks, the Committee will shed light on the IRS’s shortcomings and lay out its plan for reforming the agency by:

Improving Quality Customer Service for the Taxpayer

Filing taxes should be straightforward and simple. Today, it’s not. A lack of access to assistance, indefinite call wait-times, and difficulty obtaining information are only a few of the obstacles Americans face today when dealing with our tax administrator.

Treating Taxpayers Fairly When They Deal with the IRS

For too long, the IRS has abused its power over businesses and individuals alike. Taxpayers too often feel the deck is stacked against them when attempting to defend themselves against IRS assessments and exams. The IRS should be focused on fairly administering the tax code, not trying to win at any cost.

Modernizing an Outdated IRS to Better Serve and Protect Taxpayers

As a result of its out-of-date technology and procedures, the agency has provided poor access, security, and service for Americans who are trying to comply with the tax code. Taxpayers are not only at risk of fraud and identity theft, but they also face a lack of access to services they need. A modernized tax code calls for a modernized IRS.

Stay tuned for more blogs in the weeks ahead as the Committee works on IRS reform legislation.